Montanism and Christian faith: history repeats itself; what have we learned?

Tell me if you’ve heard of this recently. It’s a movement that taught “new, i.e. postbiblical, revelation, and the imminent end of the world,” according to the Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy.

The movement was “charismatic, schismatic” and “announced in ecstatic speech a new, final age of prophecy.”

The movement also “lived in expectation of the speedy outpouring of the Holy Spirit (the Paraclete) on the Church, of which it saw the first manifestations in its own prophets and prophetesses,” the Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church.

This movement, called Montanism after its founder Montanus, began in the second century.

Roughly one thousand and eight hundred years later, we have not seen the end of the world, we have not seen the end of claims about the imminent end of the world, and we have not seen the end of people claiming to prophesy new revelations.

One response to “Montanism and Christian faith: history repeats itself; what have we learned?

  1. Let’s hear it for Perpetua and Felicitas! (They were montanist martyrs of the second century.)

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