Category Archives: rhetoric

Why You Can’t Win

Sound arguments can’t compete with good feelings. 

Good feelings are stronger motivators than sound arguments.

Another win for the biblical worldview

Updated below

 
She was just a woman trying to live a biblical life. What went wrong? Just a lack of common sense, or does a “biblical worldview” allow for common sense?

Update:

Is it really so difficult for U.S. Christian leaders to recognize the uselessness of the word “biblical“? The word has become its own glittering generality, a beautiful sounding, emotion-evoking word that has little established, common meaning.

“Biblical” is no longer substantive, and it should not be used. When you watch the video above, and you consider the enormous range of uses for the word “biblical,” you have to come to the conclusion that it is an empty word at best.

That is not to say a point of view cannot be informed by a thorough reading of the Bible and an understanding of interpretative points of view throughout history.

But don’t kid yourself — the people who are damaging others with the use of the word “biblical” are far greater in number than those who can read thoroughly and contextually, and even they could still be wrong.

After all, there is little consensus among interpreters.

‘An illusion can never be destroyed directly’

Sketch of Søren Kierkegaard. Based on a sketch...

Image via Wikipedia

“No, an illusion can never be destroyed directly, and only by indirect means can it be radically removed…. That is, one must approach from behind the person who is under an illusion.” — Soren Kierkegaard, The Point of View for My Work as an Author, found in Kierkegaard’s Philosophy: Self-Deception and Cowardice in the Present Age by John Douglas Mullen

For an explication of this point of view, see Thomas C. Oden’s introductory essay to Parables of Kierkegaard.

Consider a similar perspective in the following poem, “Tell all the Truth but tell it slant–“, by Emily Dickinson:

Tell all the Truth but tell it slant—
Success in Cirrcuit lies
Too bright for our infirm Delight
The Truth’s superb surprise
As Lightening to the Children eased
With explanation kind
The Truth must dazzle gradually
Or every man be blind—