Tag Archives: Cato Institute

Interesting argument for the government recognizing same-sex marriage

Following the Supreme Court’s momentous ruling on government recognition of same-sex marriage this past Friday, Libertarianism.org offered an interesting line of reasoning from Jason Kuznicki of the Cato Institute.
 

 
At core, this argument should be interesting to conservative Christians as well as gays and lesbians — and everyone else — because it understands the issue of government recognition of a marriage in terms of the marriage’s fundamental nature, and that fundamental nature is the commitment between two people, not state or ecclesiastical sanction.

It’s also interesting to ask what, exactly, state or ecclesiastical sanction has contributed to the sanctity of marriage, now that the U.S. has arrived at a 50-percent divorce rate.

‘America has harsher [religious] restrictions than roughly 130 other countries,’ says The Atlantic

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” This is the first line of the first amendment in the United States Constitution; religious freedom was clearly a legal priority of the men who drafted the Bill of Rights. Yet, 225 years later, the Pew Research Center’s Religion and Public Life Project has said the United States places a “moderate” level of restrictions on religious practice compared to the other countries in the world. According to Pew, the U.S. saw a marked increase in hostility toward religion starting in 2009, and this level remained consistent in the following years.

So begins an article by Emma Green in The Atlantic entitled, “The U.S. Puts ‘Moderate’ restrictions on Religious Freedom.”

The chart with the article is fascinating, allowing an interactive look at changes in religious liberties — or losses of religious liberties — around the globe.

To me, it’s a reminder: In every corner of the United States today, the First Amendment is under attack, including ridiculous attacks on student and faculty speech on university campuses as well as federal government assaults on individual conscience.

You ought to seek the most liberty for everyone, even people you dislike and disagree-with. The alternative? Liberties that alternate with the fluctuations of political power.

 

The Washington Post’s simplistic view of diversity

David Boaz of the Cato Institute dissects and dices the Washington Post‘s painfully simple view of diversity in this blog post.