Tag Archives: writing

Using the language I know


I thought at this point I had made my sense of things clear: For several types of reasons, I’m just not sure about the Christian faith anymore.

However, most of my life, I have lived and learned within the context of at least four distinct forms of Protestant Christianity.

I find nothing inconsistent about being doubtful while critiquing Christian leaders based upon the inconsistencies between their public claims and their ministries.

Especially when those Christian leaders made my doubts seem more legit, not less.

I once read an interview with the man behind the band Iron & Wine. He said some folks had asked him why he uses biblical language and allusions in his songwriting when he is not a believer.

The thrust of his answer, as I recall it, was something like this: it’s the language available to me, and it fits the settings and characters of my songwriting.

I certainly see the richness of various Christian traditions. In a world gone gnostic, with so much of our communication taking place in disembodied formats, Christianity still has rich veins of language and symbolism and ritual, however despised by the new iconoclasts of both evangelicalism and atheism.

In a world gone gnostic, the thought of logos made flesh ought to fascinate anyone who appreciates tactile, sensory experience.

Beyond that, I would say to any young writers in my classrooms, use the materials you have — stories from your lives, images, settings, characters, cadences, symbols, archetypes, and songs.

Sometimes, if you’re diligent in setting the context, the truth will show up.

That feeling when… (self-concept versus self-knowledge)


Sometimes, the self-concept doesn’t know what the self has been doing. 

The only mystery allowed is the mystery that can be explained


Within the lesson emerges an analogy:

‘In the act of writing about art, then, you press language to the point of fracture and try to do what writing cannot do: account for the experience. Otherwise, you elide the essential mystery, which is the reason for writing anything at all. The easy alternative is just to circumnavigate the occasion of seeing something—to “professionalize” art criticism into a branch of academic art history—to presume that works of art are already utterances in art-language that need only to be translate into a better language to achieve perfect transparency. In this way, the practice of criticism is transformed into a kind of Protestant civil service dedicated to translating art-language into a word-language that neutralizes its power in the interest of public order. The writer’s pathological need to control and reconstitute the fluid universe of not-writing is fortuitously disguised by this strategem—since in a truly “professional” discourse, no more intimate engagement with the “needy” object is required than that of a doctor with a patient, and no more stress need be placed upon the language than that required by the clinical assignment of names to symptoms.’ (boldface added) — Dave Hickey, from his essay “Air Guitar,” from Air Guitar: Essays on Art and Democracy

‘the problem of Lewis the storyteller’ in Text Patterns at The New Atlantis


“I don’t think Lewis was by any means a natural storyteller, and all of his fiction suffers to one degree or another from his shortcomings in this regard,” sayeth literary critic and distinguished humanities professor Alan Jacobs. “Every time he sat down to write a story he was moving outside the sphere of his strongest writerly gifts.” To get Jacobs’ full view on the matter, as well as a few words about storytelling differences between C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, read the entire post here: “the problem of Lewis the storyteller – Text Patterns – The New Atlantis”.

A quick note on digital humanities


On the 50th anniversary of C.S. Lewis’s death, a consideration of his poetry


Like eyes of one long dead the empty windows stare
And I fear to cross the garden, I fear to linger there…

from the poem “Alexandrines” by C.S. Lewis

 

C.S. Lewis fan trivia includes the factoid that he died on the same day as President John F. Kennedy and author Aldous Huxley.

But 50th anniversaries tend to be big deals, and on this anniversary, while new documentaries honor JFK, Lewis is receiving a quieter yet substantial honor.

Lewis’s “devotion to [poetry] will be honored this month with the unveiling of a monument at the Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey, 50 years after his death,” writes Laura C. Mallonee in “The Imaginative Man,” written for PoetryFoundation.org.

Despite being best-known for The Chronicles of Narnia and Mere Christianity — as well as maybe The Screwtape Letters — Lewis really, really wanted to be a poet.

In recent years, that biographical factoid received serious scholarly study from Don W. King, who wrote C.S. Lewis, Poet: The Legacy of His Poetic Impulse — a project that spurred a study of Lewis’s more-successful poet friend, Ruth Pitter.

In this brief post, I’ll say Lewis’s poetry is interesting for two principle reasons — although for a thorough examination of his poetry, see King’s C.S. Lewis, Poet.

First, Lewis wrote his poetry with an ear tuned to meter. For example, his poem “Alexandrines” is a collection of 13 of the lines for which the poem is named. An alexandrine is a 12-syllable iambic line.

Second, Lewis’s immersion in ancient mythology influenced many of his poems. See, for example, “Vitrea Circe,” which is about the Circe of Homeric legend.

Also see “The Satyr,” which follows a satyr “Through the meadows, through the valleys” where “all the faerie kin he rallies.”

Certainly questions of why Lewis has no intellectual and aesthetic heirs today — especially among the Christians who desperately want someone to pick up the Narnian mantle — can be answered with attention to his history and development as a person.

Lewis was saturated in English poetry and ancient verse, in languages living and dead, in stories historical and mythological.

I suspect many Christian writers who have tried to imitate Lewis jumped the gun and hopped directly into allegories of the Gospels, but Lewis never would have written a book entitled Mere Allegory.

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‘Biblical’ destruction


1-Bibel-1USA Today describes the Colorado rainfall as “Biblical.” Indeed we appreciate the rainfall’s adherence to dogmatic teaching. Then again, if you browse a Christian bookstore, you’ll notice just about anything is worthy of the “Biblical” label. So now I fear the rainfall will become anything it wants to be — and destroy even more in the process.